POSTED 5 Aug 2019 - 14:37

How do you view the rise of Boris Johnson as UK Prime Minister?

-1
Vote down!
Do you expect an orderly Brexit or further chaos, with repercussions on business?
Administrator
16
false

Responses

Seamus Phan, Chief Content and Technology Officer, McGallen & Bolden
5 Aug 2019 - 15:21

Unity is strength, and a unified Europe can be a powerful trade and diplomatic entity. I do not foresee an orderly Brexit under Prime Minister Boris Johnson if he indeed lives up to his words.

With his hardline rhetoric, the eventual Brexit, especially a hard Brexit, would not help UK businesses or communities at all, but would most likely alienate a formidable ally (the EU) who has been brethren by lineage, history, culture and economy for thousands of years.

I certainly hope Brexit becomes a stillborn, and UK remains in the EU. Being part of the EU bears a cost to the UK, but in the long run, the EU with UK in it is a collective force to be reckoned with.

-1
Vote down!
Henry Tan, Group CEO & Chief Innovation Officer, Nexia TS
5 Aug 2019 - 15:20

The trend of the rise of right-wing leaders in the world is quite clear. Whilst we may not appreciate the style of leaders like Donald Trump and Boris Johnson, we have to accept that the general public appreciates that they are not the usual leaders and are keen for change. Johnson (or Bojo in short) has become UK PM at a time that is not the easiest and whatever he is positioning the UK for, the country is prepared for a ''no deal' Brexit. Ultimately, it is a negotiation stance.

In the end senses will prevail and he is not going to get majority support in Parliament if that is the ultimate outcome.

I believe UK is in need of someone like Bojo in this period to provide some certainty to the markets. UK has to be determined to see through Brexit in whatever form (though hopefully not a ''no deal'' Brexit). Thereafter, UK businesses will go through a period of consolidation but I believe the country will continue to find a place in the world economy.

-1
Vote down!
Zaheer K Merchant, Regional Director (Singapore & Europe), QI Group of Companies
5 Aug 2019 - 15:20

My simplest response to both questions is: enigmatic uncertainty. Boris Johnson has shown he has the stomach for a fight - the cleanout of 15 members from the Cabinet; brave appointments including hardliner Priti Patel and Sajid Javid show resolve, and will, to provide financial muscle to the cause and to the economy. So as PM, Boris wants to show he means business.

On Brexit itself, Europe and Britain are in a quandary. Certainly from a manufacturing (and business) repercussions perspective, talk of a no-deal departure is already having impact. Vauxhall Motors owners, Groupe PSA, have warned of transfer out of Ellesmere to name but one instance, since seamless trade, sourcing and export of goods (and services) has become an issue. Coupled with stockpiling and inventory runups, it all makes for unhappy reading.

I don't expect chaos, since I believe Boris will push the boundaries to the maximum, then negotiate down as he is far too canny for chaos (and its effects). But I do believe that there is no phlegmatic British approach presently, as depicted by the British pound hitting new lows against the Singapore dollar last week.

The silver lining is - October is close. We will know, or find out, very soon.

-1
Vote down!
Toby Koh, Group MD, Ademco Security Group
5 Aug 2019 - 15:19

A no-deal Brexit seems increasingly likely with time ticking away and the EU going off on summer holidays.

There certainly will be a measure of chaos and confusion, especially amongst the smaller businesses in the UK. The larger companies including financial institutions have put resources into planning for Brexit and hence will have things under control. Small firm and exporters appear to have not done so.

The readiness of infrastructure and administrative services to handle Brexit is in question at this time. The complexity of Brexit is immense and nobody has a clear and complete grasp of what may happen.

The world will watch in anticipation of what will happen from Nov 1. It is likely to hurt.

-1
Vote down!
Toby Koh, Group MD, Ademco Security Group
5 Aug 2019 - 15:19

A no-deal Brexit seems increasingly likely with time ticking away and the EU going off on summer holidays.

There certainly will be a measure of chaos and confusion, especially amongst the smaller businesses in the UK. The larger companies including financial institutions have put resources into planning for Brexit and hence will have things under control. Small firm and exporters appear to have not done so.

The readiness of infrastructure and administrative services to handle Brexit is in question at this time. The complexity of Brexit is immense and nobody has a clear and complete grasp of what may happen.

The world will watch in anticipation of what will happen from Nov 1. It is likely to hurt.

-1
Vote down!
David Leong Managing, Director, PeopleWorldwide Consulting Pte Ltd.
5 Aug 2019 - 15:15

''No ifs or buts'' is PM Boris Johnson's unwavering commitment to Brexit. He is seen as a maverick with more jokers in his deck of cards than an average pack. This made him somewhat unpredictable and, with his gaffes, he is seen as an unconventional wild card prime minister.

Brexit at this late stage cannot be orderly with the Irish backstop conundrum hanging loose. This is effectively a UK-EU negotiation with no hard border. Northern Ireland is positioned to be UK's back alley link to EU. The prime minister seems reluctant to pursue this or any new Brexit terms.

PM Johnson's concern is not so much the slump in the value of sterling or the moribund economy but to see UK out of the EU door first. The stabilisation of the economy and any upheavals and repercussions can be dealt when UK's feet are out of the door, delivering on the people's mandate on Brexit. He is all ready to embrace a no-deal Brexit. His ''no ifs or buts'' says it all.

Vote up!
1
Lim Soon Hock, Managing Director, PLAN-B ICAG Pte Ltd
5 Aug 2019 - 15:14

That the new UK Prime Minister is another Trump in the making is of concern to many. It would further aggravate the problems and disruptions that have already been created by ''Trumpism'' on the world order, especially relating to free trade.

Brexit will happen with or without a deal with the EC. Boris Johnson will want to show that he can deliver, an opportunity that he would not want to miss.

Any disruption to businesses by Brexit will be temporary. This is because Britain has a long history and track record in international trade, underpinned by her rich legacy and established institutions, which will put her in good stead and for the benefit of her trading partners.

-1
Vote down!
Maren Schweitzer, Director, Schweizer World Pte Ltd
5 Aug 2019 - 15:13

With this leader's policies, it will be a roller coaster ride for the economy. It is hard to discern what's real and what isn't, what's rhetoric and what's not. Certainly, this type of behaviour is poison for all of us in the global community.

A no-deal Brexit is likely to have an economic impact in the broader region well beyond the companies that are inextricably tied to Britain.

In our businesses we have set up one scenario that is assuming a heavy thunderstorm. So we are already heading to an ''alternate airport'' where we can land and sustain ourselves, even though it is far away.

In my opinion we should not spend a lot of time on planning various scenarios while discussing vulnerabilities. Instead, set up procedures with your team for thunderstorm and execute.

-1
Vote down!

Respond to this question

* Required field